Easy Deviled Eggs + WIN an Egg Farmers of Ontario prize pack!

4 Nov

I was “eggcited” to receive an “eggsquisite” basket from my friends at Egg Farmers of Ontario in celebration of World Egg Month, even more so because it was filled with goodies to make a tray of Deviled Eggs! I’ve always enjoyed eating them but I had never made them, so I was a little nervous about how they would turn out since my guests were going to arrive in an hour! I was pleasantly surprised to find out that they were really easy to make and I was really happy with how they turned out. Looks like I’ve found another “go to” appetizer recipe! Do you have a Deviled Egg recipe to share? Please post it in the comments section below, I would love to try it out.  By the way, there’s a great contest below the recipe if you’re interested : )

Easy Deviled Eggs

Makes 24 deviled egg halves

Ingredients:

12 hard-cooked eggs, peeled and cooled

1/3 cup (75 mL) regular or light mayonnaise

2 tbsp of finely chopped chives

Salt and pepper

Paprika (optional)

Optional garnish:

Small bunch of young (thin) asparagus

2 tbsp of olive oil

Salt and pepper

Directions:

Once the eggs have cooled, carefully cut them in half lengthwise. Scoop out the yolks and place them in a bowl. Set whites aside, wiping them clean of any yolk residue with a piece of paper towel. If you have a serving plate or deviled egg holder, you can arrange the egg white portions now.

Using a fork, mash the reserved yolks until creamy. Mix in the mayonnaise and chopped chives. Add salt and pepper to taste.

If you have a piping bag, scoop the yolk mixture into it. Using a wide star tip, pipe the mixture into each egg white half. If you don’t have a piping bag, you can scoop the mixture into a Ziploc bag, cut off a corner of the bag and squeeze to fill each egg white half. You can then lightly sprinkle each egg half with paprika for decoration (optional).

For the garnish, which is optional, wash and dry the asparagus bunch and trim off the woody ends. Then heat the olive oil on medium high heat in a small frying pan. When the oil is hot, lay the asparagus in the pan. Sautee and turn frequently to cook the asparagus on all sides. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Once the asparagus have cooked to your taste, remove them onto a cutting board to cool.  Then, cut off the tips to fit the size of your egg halves. You can lay them across each egg diagonally.

Serve immediately or cover and store in the refrigerator for up to a day.

CONTEST: I’m giving away an Egg Farmers of Ontario prize pack including a Lagostina frying pan, a silicon whisk and some egg-citing recipes. Please note that you must be a resident of Ontario to win, it is an Egg Farmers of Ontario contest after all!

TO ENTER:

Visit www.eggfarmersofontario.ca and click on one of the photos on the landing page to watch videos featuring our proud egg farmers and their families. Then, at the bottom of this blog post, share one (1) “egg-ducational” (educational!) fact you learned. You may enter up to five (5) times. P.S. Don’t forget to include your Twitter, Facebook or blog site address so I know how to reach you! It’s that easy!

Again, you must be a resident of Ontario to enter!

Hurry! Contest closes on Friday November 9 at 12 pm EST. The winner will be announced later that day. Good luck!

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58 Responses to “Easy Deviled Eggs + WIN an Egg Farmers of Ontario prize pack!”

  1. Hubert H November 5, 2012 at 5:24 am #

    From the VanderWees, an intense light is shined on all the eggs to see what’s in them and check for cracks and such! @hubeedubee

    • Davindra Ramnarine November 9, 2012 at 11:32 am #

      From Veldmans: Laying hens need a lot of calcium

  2. Maggie Cheung November 5, 2012 at 10:50 am #

    1 egg-ducational fact from (Greniers): a tracing/log book – to help trace back to the problem if required

    • Maggie Cheung (@magscheung) November 5, 2012 at 10:53 am #

      from McKillops: renewable energy is given back to customers through producing eggs.

    • Davindra Ramnarine November 9, 2012 at 11:35 am #

      The only difference between a brown & white egg is the colour.

  3. colleenmariecole November 5, 2012 at 11:24 am #

    I learned that eggs are produced naturally, If the needs of the chicken are taken care of, the chicken will naturally produce eggs.

  4. Avi Bessin November 5, 2012 at 2:09 pm #

    Laying hens need a very high amount of calcium (thanks Veldman family!)

  5. Nancy R. November 5, 2012 at 2:18 pm #

    I learned that there’s no difference between brown eggs and white eggs, except that white eggs come from white chickens and the brown ones from from brown chickens.

    • Cynthia November 5, 2012 at 5:20 pm #

      Cool: brown eggs from brown chickens, white eggs from white chickens! I always thought there was more to it…

  6. Wayne S November 5, 2012 at 2:40 pm #

    I learned from Chris Koop that hens can lay eggs every single day

  7. Henry C. November 5, 2012 at 4:05 pm #

    Same as the poster above, learned that nutritionally, white and brown eggs have no difference. @HenryCalibre8

  8. julie g November 5, 2012 at 9:47 pm #

    The chickens need routine and to be relaxed to produce eggs. (the kids in the video were really cute in their overalls!

  9. Vicki Ho November 6, 2012 at 9:44 am #

    From the VenderWees, they chill the eggs to 9 1/2 C.

  10. Wayne S November 6, 2012 at 11:30 am #

    I didn’t know that brown and white eggs were identical other than colour. Yet brown eggs cost more!

  11. Brook November 6, 2012 at 3:47 pm #

    I guess like us moms to be, the chickens need to be as relaxed as us to lay our eggs…well I should say to give birth! Very cute video!

  12. Heather Holmberg November 6, 2012 at 5:44 pm #

    I learned (and was shocked) that white and brown eggs have no difference between the 2 … wow !! and that hens can lay eggs every day ! double wow !

  13. John Sam November 6, 2012 at 5:48 pm #

    I learned that white and brown eggs are the exact same

  14. bluevektor November 6, 2012 at 6:14 pm #

    Chickens need to be relaxed to produce eggs.

  15. Vivian D. November 6, 2012 at 7:33 pm #

    I learned not to use fresh eggs when peeling a hard boiled egg and start cracking from the widest part of the egg.

  16. Ron November 6, 2012 at 8:46 pm #

    McKillops – as much technology you have, you can’t take the person out of the farming. You need both.

  17. Ron November 6, 2012 at 8:48 pm #

    Wests – today’s farms are fully computerized, and the egg room, barn, and chickens are constantly being monitored.

  18. Ron November 6, 2012 at 8:50 pm #

    Den Hollanders – their priority is their hens.

  19. Ron November 6, 2012 at 8:52 pm #

    VanderWees – after packaging and before shipping, the eggs are chilled to a temperature of 9.5C

  20. Ron November 6, 2012 at 8:55 pm #

    Greniers – their eggs are collected two times every day, and as soon as they’re collected the eggs are put into the cooler room.

  21. Donna L. November 6, 2012 at 9:24 pm #

    I learned from the Dell Hollanders family that hens like routine, and less stressed hens produce more and better eggs.

  22. Stephanie L November 6, 2012 at 11:07 pm #

    I learned that farmers aid the chickens with feed, water and ventilation.

  23. Stephanie L November 6, 2012 at 11:09 pm #

    I learned that eggs are weighed to see what grade they are!

  24. Stephanie L November 6, 2012 at 11:14 pm #

    I learned that eggs are washed with a bit of soap in the cleaning process

  25. ginette4 November 7, 2012 at 8:44 am #

    I watched the Grenier family video and learnt that they use gentle light it makes the bird feel safe

  26. Tania B November 7, 2012 at 10:35 am #

    I learned from the Graham family that they ship their eggs out twice a week to grocery stores across Ontario but you can pick up their eggs from their “Egg House” in St. Mary’s, Ontario as well.

    @tjbugnet

  27. Wayne S November 7, 2012 at 11:30 am #

    I learned that how you treat your hens makes a difference in egg production. A happy hen is a productive hen!

  28. Sarah N. November 7, 2012 at 1:00 pm #

    White eggs come from white chickens and brown eggs come from brown chickens. The Mullet Koops video.

  29. Francine November 7, 2012 at 7:40 pm #

    The Wests continue to take university courses to stay current

  30. jenna3967 November 7, 2012 at 8:15 pm #

    I learned how to make French Toast Casserole from the Graham family in St Marys Ontario

  31. jenna3967 November 7, 2012 at 8:16 pm #

    I learned that the Schenk family from Wyoming, ON also farms corn, soybeans and wheat in addition to their egg production.

  32. Betty S November 8, 2012 at 6:45 am #

    From the Veldmans sight, they grow their own corn to feed to the chickens to produce the eggs. Chickens need calcium to produce good eggs

  33. ginette4 November 8, 2012 at 9:00 am #

    Learnt from the Veldman family that hens need high amounts of calcium

  34. Wayne S November 8, 2012 at 10:54 am #

    I learned that, unlike many other industries, machines will never be able to replace humans when it comes to egg farming!

  35. Amana S. November 8, 2012 at 12:05 pm #

    I learned from the Mullet Koop family that chickens can lay eggs everyday and that there is no difference between white or brown eggs as they come from white or brown chickens.

  36. jen s. November 8, 2012 at 2:04 pm #

    from the greniers: i leanred that they use optimum gentle light on the birds to help the birds feel safe – the proper light cannot be too light or too dark.
    @ lelalacc

  37. jen s. November 8, 2012 at 2:09 pm #

    from the McCombs: there is a lot of science involved in chicken and egg farming and diane thinks that we have not yet realized the possibilities that eggs have to offer and the best thing about egg farming is the hope for the future.
    @ lelalacc

  38. Carol November 8, 2012 at 8:20 pm #

    White & Brown eggs are the same. I amazed that hens can produce eggs everyday.

  39. ana s November 8, 2012 at 9:42 pm #

    the greniers talked about the optimal light, mild, to keep the chickens happy and producing well. It looked like such a clean and professional farm run by a dedicated family

  40. gibberish (Julie G.) November 8, 2012 at 10:48 pm #

    I learned that when hens are relaxed, their egg production is better.

  41. gibberish (Julie G.) November 8, 2012 at 10:49 pm #

    I learned that eggs thrive on routine – being fed at the same time every day.

  42. gibberish (Julie G.) November 8, 2012 at 10:55 pm #

    I also learned that many of these farms have been in families for generations.

  43. gibberish (Julie G.) November 8, 2012 at 10:58 pm #

    I learned that today’s farms are computerized & have alarms to alert the farmers if a problem arises – for example if the temperature in the barn gets too hot.

  44. gibberish (Julie G.) November 8, 2012 at 11:00 pm #

    Eggs are washed with a little bit of soap & hot water before they are graded.

  45. Francine November 9, 2012 at 5:30 am #

    I learned that the Eisses’ also grow sunflowers as an alternate crop.

  46. Betty S November 9, 2012 at 5:32 am #

  47. ginette4 November 9, 2012 at 9:09 am #

    I learnt from the Wests family that their barn is set up on a computer system that has an alarm system on them that are kept up to the temperature of their egg room, the temperature of their barn, how much feed the chickens are eating and drinking

  48. Wayne S November 9, 2012 at 11:03 am #

    I learned that egg grading is based on weight, instead of colour or anything else

  49. jen s. November 9, 2012 at 11:04 am #

    from mullet koop family: the difference between brown and white eggs is really just the colour of shell and that white eggs come from white chickens and brown eggs come from brown chickens.
    @ lelalacc

  50. jen s. November 9, 2012 at 11:18 am #

    from the Schenks: how to peel a hard boiled egg: don’t use a fresh egg, instead put it in the fridge for a week and start with wide end of egg because there will now be an air pocket there. smash egg all around that end, and it will be easier to peel, then rinse off off egg to get rid of any lefover shell.
    @ lelalacc

  51. jen s. November 9, 2012 at 11:23 am #

    from the Van Aerts: i learned about what makes an egg and egg farm organic. to be an organic farmer, the farm has to have 3 years without chemicals on its land, and an organic egg must come from a hen fed chemical-free feed.
    @ lelalacc

  52. Davindra Ramnarine November 9, 2012 at 11:40 am #

    From the Den Hollanders: A routine relaxes the hens and this routine helps them produce better eggs.

  53. Davindra Ramnarine November 9, 2012 at 11:41 am #

    From the Den Hollanders: Technology helps the farmers ensure that their laying hens are kept safe, comfortable and relaxed.

  54. Davindra Ramnarine November 9, 2012 at 11:45 am #

    From Van Aerts: Only after 3 years without chemicals on his land can a farmer be considered organic.

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